January 4, 2018

2018 New Year’s Resolution: More Exercise and a Healthy Diet of… Test Automation

Written by Jason Kellenbenz

‘Agile’… ‘Lean’… ‘Fitnesse’… ‘Fit’… ‘(Win)Runner’… ‘Cucumber’… ‘Eggplant’… ‘Lime’… As 2018 draws near, one might hear a few of these words bantered around the water cooler at this time of year as part of the trendy discussion topic: our personal New Year’s resolutions to get back into shape and eat healthy. While many of my well-intentioned colleagues are indeed well on their way to a healthier 2018, many of these words were actually discussed during a strategy session I attended recently –  which, surprisingly, based on the fact that many of these words are truly foods – did not cover new diet and exercise trends for 2018. Instead, this planning session agenda focused on another trendy discussion topic in our office as we close out 2017 and flip the calendar over to 2018: software test automation.


“SERIOUSLY – cucumbers and limes and fitness(e)?!?”

This thought came to mind after the planning session and gave me a chuckle. I thought, “If a complete stranger walked by our meeting room and heard these words thrown around, what would they think we were talking about?”

This humorous thought resonated further when recently – and rather coincidentally – a client asked me for a high-level, summary explanation as to how I would implement automated testing on a software development project. It was a broad and rather open-ended question – not meant to be technical in nature or to solicit a solution. Rather, how would I, with a background in Agile Business Analysis and Testing (i.e. I am not a developer) go about kickstarting and implementing a test automation framework for a particular software development project?

This all got me thinking. I’ve never seen an official survey, but I assume many people employed or with an interest in software development could provide a reasonable and well-informed response if ever asked to define or discuss software test automation, the many benefits of automated testing and how the practice delivers requisite business value. I believe, however, that there is a substantial dividing line between understanding the general concepts of test automation and successfully implementing a high-quality and sustainable automated testing suite. In other words, those who are considered experts in this domain are truly experts – they possess a unique and sought-after skill set and are very good at what they do. There really isn’t any middle ground, in my opinion.

My reasoning here is that getting from ‘Point A’ (simply understanding the concepts) to ‘Point B’ (implementing and maintaining an effective and sustainable test automation platform) is often an arduous and laborious effort, which unfortunately, in many cases, does not always result in success. At a fundamental level, the journey to a successful test automation practice involves the following:

  • Financial investment: Like with any software development quality assurance initiative, test automation requires a significant financial investment (in both tools and personnel). The notion here, however – like any other reasonable investment – is that an upfront financial investment should provide a solid return down the line if the venture is successful. This is not simply a two-point ‘spike’ user story assigned to someone to research the latest test automation tools. To use the poker metaphor – if you are ready to commit, then you should go all-in.
  • Time investment: How many software development project teams have you heard stating that they have extra time on their hands? Surely, not many, if any at all. Kicking off an automated testing initiative also requires a significant upfront time investment. Resources otherwise assigned to standard analysis, development or testing tasks will need to shift roles and contribute to the automated testing effort. Researching and learning the technical aspects of automated testing tools, along with the actual effort to design, build out and execute a suite of automated tests requires an exceptional team effort. Reassigning team tasks initially will reduce a team’s velocity, although similar to the financial investment concept, the hope is significant time savings and improved quality down the line in later sprints as larger deployments and major releases draw near.
  • Dedicated resources with unique, sought after skill sets: In my experience, I’ve seen that usually the highest rated employees with the most institutional/system knowledge and experience are called on to manage and drive automated testing efforts. These highly rated employees are also more than likely the most expensive, as the roles require a unique technical and analytical skill set, along with a significant knowledge of corresponding business processes. Because these organizational ‘all-stars’ initially will be focused solely on the test automation effort, other quality assurance tasks will inherently assume added risk. This risk needs to be mitigated in order to prevent a reduction in quality in other organizational efforts.

It turns out that the coincidental internal automated testing discussion and timely client question – along with the ongoing challenge in the QA domain associated with the aforementioned ‘Point A to Point B’ metaphor – led to a documented, bulleted list response to the client’s question. Let’s call it an Agile test automation best-practices checklist. This list can be found below and provides several concepts and ideas an organization could utilize in order to incorporate test automation into their current software testing/QA practice. Since I was familiar with the client’s organization, personnel and product offerings, I could provide a bit more detail than necessary. The idea here is not the ‘what’, as you will not find any specific automation tools mentioned. Instead, this list covers the ‘how’: the process-oriented concepts of test automation along with the associated benefits of each concept.

This list should provide your team with a handy starting point, or a ‘bridge’ between Point A and Point B. If your team can identify with many of the concepts in this list and relate them to your current testing process and procedures, then further pursuing an automated testing initiative should be a reasonable option for your team or project.

More importantly, this list can be used as a tool and foundation for non-technical members of a software development team (e.g. BA, Tester, ScrumMaster, etc.) in order to start the conversation – essentially, to decide if automated testing fits in with your established process and procedures, whether or not it will provide a return on investment and to ensure if you do indeed embark down the test automation path, that you continue to progress forward as applications, personnel and teams mature, grow and inevitably, change. Understand these concepts and when to apply them, and you can learn more about cucumbers, limes and eggplants as you progress further down the test automation path:

To successfully implement and advance an effective and sustainable automated testing initiative, I make every effort to follow the following strategy which combines proven Agile test automation best-practices with personal, hands-on project and testing experience. As such, this is not an all-inclusive list, rather just one IT consultant’s answer to a client’s question:

For folks new to the world of test automation and for those who had absolutely no idea that ‘Cucumber’ is not only a healthy vegetable but is also the name of an automated testing tool, I hope this blog entry is a good start for your journey into the world of test automation. For the ‘experts’ out there, please respond and let me know if I missed any important steps or tasks, or, how you might do things differently. After all, we’re all in this together, and as more knowledge is spread throughout the IT world, the more we can further enhance our processes.

So, if you’ll excuse me now, I’m going to go ahead and plan out my 2018 New Year’s resolution exercise regimen and diet. Any additional thoughts on test automation will have to wait until next year.

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