May 27, 2015

The “Agile Business Analyst” – The “Jose Oquendo” of Your Scrum Team (Part 2)

Written by Jason Kellenbenz

In Part 1 of this blog series, I presented a high-level summary of the many different opportunities that Business Analysts (BA) can pursue in an Agile BA role, often resulting in new and exciting experiences. I also highlighted some of the differences between today’s “Agile BA” and the traditional “Waterfall BA”. Finally, I presented an interesting metaphor for today’s Agile BA, one of a Major League Baseball “utility player” (in this case, Jose Oquendo – a player who accomplished the rare feat of playing at every position during his 12-year MLB career.)

Part 2 of this blog entry focuses on the five key functional areas (aka “opportunities”) where I feel Agile BA’s can contribute or take outright ownership of a certain project task or responsibility. A key point to remember is that in order for these opportunities to present themselves, circumstances need to exist which ultimately depend on the dynamics of a project and the makeup of the particular team. Surely we don’t want to step on any toes or introduce team conflict. But if the opportunity is presented and a need has clearly been established, take the bull by the horns and run with these five opportunities:

  • Project Management
  • Product Management (aka the Product Backlog)
  • Testing
  • Documentation
  • Collaboration (with Project Stakeholders and Team Members)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT – WORK WITH (OR AS) THE SCRUMMASTER

On today’s project teams, Agile BA’s are usually best-suited to provide project management/ScrumMaster support whenever the need arises. And let’s be real – with PM’s and ScrumMasters constantly being pulled in several different directions, the Agile BA can tackle a numerous amount of responsibilities associated with this role.

In all likelihood, Agile BA’s have the experience necessary to handle many of the day-to-day responsibilities of a PM or ScrumMaster. The Agile BA can facilitate any of the recurring “events” as needed – the daily scrum (or “standup”), sprint planning, sprint review and sprint retrospective.

In many cases, the Agile BA is as close to (or even sometimes more engaged) with the project’s product backlog than the actual PM. This knowledge of the past, current and future state of the product backlog enables the Agile BA to assist with several project-related artifacts – for example, sprint and release burn-up/burn-down charts.

Successfully leading and delivering on many of these crucial project events and tasks not only contributes to the success of the team, but it also provides valuable on-the-job training. For Agile BA’s who want to eventually move into a PM or ScrumMaster role, this experience is invaluable.

THE “PROXY PRODUCT OWNER” – TODAY’S “PRODUCT OWNER” REALITY

Lately, it seems that a fully-engaged Product Owner is more of a luxury than a norm on today’s Agile projects. Agile BA’s can benefit from the potential subject-matter knowledge gained and added exposure by bridging this gap and acting as a “Proxy Product Owner”. In cases where a truly-dedicated Product Owner is not a reality, no one is better suited to step into this role than the Agile BA.

BA’s usually develop a solid rapport with the customer and can act as a liaison between the customer and the project team whenever needed. And as stated earlier, the Agile BA probably has the most experience working with the project’s user stories and backlog. On fast-moving development projects, many decisions are needed real-time, and waiting for answers from an absent Product Owner usually hinders the team’s progress.

TESTING – AFTERALL, WHO KNOWS THE STORY BETTER THAN THE BA?

Many Agile teams have already moved to this model, but for teams which have not, here is another opportunity. As previously mentioned, BA’s handing their work over to testers ‘waterfall-style’ is an outdated and inefficient practice. I have seen that 2-3 fully engaged Agile BA’s can efficiently handle the workload of 2-3 full-time BA’s and 2-3 full-time testers. Instead of separating requirements and functional testing tasks for a particular piece of functionality (e.g. user story), Agile BA’s focus on the user story as a whole – from origination (story creation) through implementation (fully-tested, potentially shippable product.) This is not to say that other methods of specialized testing aren’t needed, but in many cases, the best person to drive a user story to “done” is the Agile BA.

Automated testing has also become an invaluable practice on software development projects and provides yet another opportunity for Agile BA’s to contribute in the testing arena. With working knowledge of the current state of the application and product backlog, Agile BA’s have the capability to define and develop a project’s ongoing automated testing suite. Depending on the testing tools employed by the team, BA’s can “pair” with a technical resource (e.g. java developer). In this scenario, the developer handles the technical components of the automated testing suite while the BA designs, builds and manages the suite from a functional perspective.

COLLABORATION – BEFORE YOU KNOW IT, YOU’RE THE PROJECT’S “GO-TO” PERSON

I have included “collaboration” as an opportunity for Agile BA’s because collaboration, indeed, leads to opportunities. In my previous Waterfall experiences, BA’s didn’t collaborate much. In today’s Agile world, the Agile BA can really become a project’s “go-to” person. The collaboration piece also closely ties in with the previously mentioned PM/ScrumMaster and Product Owner opportunities.

For example, facilitating a sprint review or presenting a product demo provides invaluable experience and exposure. Sprint review meetings often include executives and/or stakeholders whom otherwise do not participate at all towards the project (basically, you see them once every two weeks). Leading these sessions provides direct communication with the “customer”, providing valuable feedback which can be relayed back to the team. Since entire project teams rarely attend these informational sessions, the team will start looking to you to provide the important feedback that we all value working on Agile projects. Personally, I have always looked forward to returning to the team room and have always appreciated team members asking, “so, how did it go!?”, after each sprint demo. At the same time, I am always glad to be able to provide that feedback to the team which we can use for future success.

DOCUMENTATION – CHANGE DOCUMENTATION FROM A TEDIUS TASK TO A VALUABLE COMMODITY

Even in today’s Agile world, most software development projects require some essential “dirty work”. The BA role has certainly evolved, but we should not completely abandon our roots. While we’ve all heard repeatedly (sometimes to our detriment) that the Agile Manifesto preaches valuing working software over comprehensive documentation, certain documentation can be critical to the success of projects.

I have seen that, if applied effectively, this basic Agile tenet not only reduces redundant documentation, but it helps teams focus on where documentation actually adds value to a project. Instead of documenting a requirement or process as part of an extensive list of deliverables promised six months ago (which will never be read or will become irrelevant), we document exactly what is needed, today. Most likely, information and processes which need to be documented aren’t even known at the outset of the project. Due to the fact that writing is a core skillset possessed by most BA’s, Agile BA’s are well-positioned to accomplish many of the documentation deliverables needed over the duration of a project.

NOW, GET TO WORK!

You’ve just finished reading this blog entry and your new sprint starts next week. It’s not entirely unrealistic that you can begin working in each of the areas mentioned in this blog over the next two weeks (if you haven’t been already). Offer to facilitate your upcoming sprint planning or review session. Ask the PM if you can contribute to the upcoming metrics reports (e.g. sprint/release burndown). If you aren’t already, start testing user stories – start at a high-level, ensuring that all acceptance criteria is met. Take a few hours, dive into and familiarize yourself with the product backlog. Offer to facilitate the sprint review and invite stakeholders who have become disengaged. And finally, document that process flow which has been taking up valuable whiteboard real-estate for the last several weeks (and really needs to be erased)!

Before you know it, you’re pursuing five completely new opportunities in a matter of two weeks. It might be similar to trying out three completely new positions on a baseball diamond. More importantly, you may even finally be able to explain exactly why Jose Oquendo was such a valuable player to have on a Major League Baseball team.

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